Geared To The Times Foreword To YFC Hisotry

PLEASE, I WOULD LIKE TO BE REFERRED TO AS AJITH FERNANDO IN THIS BOOK AND NOT AS DR AJITH FERNANDO. PLEASE! Foreword Ajith Fernando “Geared to the Times; Anchored to the Rock.” This slogan, introduced by Youth for Christ President Dr. Bob Cook in 1948, has stood the test of time and continues to describe what Youth for Christ is about. When YFC Sri Lanka started in 1965 there was a great need for youth ministry among Christians, and YFC set about trying to meet that need. Geared to the times meant trying to bring vital faith to youth from Christian backgrounds. Soon we realised that the youth ministry in churches was gaining momentum and the time had come for us to make unchurched youth our main focus. We had to relearn a lot of things. Music styles, drama styles and ministry strategy… all these things had to be changed. Our once famous large rallies did not attract unchurched youth, and we gave those up. Our Christians friends began to ask, “What has happened to YFC; we don’t see any ministry anymore?” The reason was that we were working among the unchurched and the churched people did not see us working. As youth culture kept changing and as cultures vary widely in different parts of the country we had to keep constantly changing our methods. Things that worked in one part of Colombo didn’t seem to work in another part even with the same language group. Substantial differences were seen between the ministries in the Colombo area and in other parts of the nation. But always we tried to build on the solid foundation and approach to ministry that was established during the leadership of our founder Sam Sherrard with evangelism and discipling as the main focus. I can think of three main factors which have helped us remain anchored to the rock. Firstly, we have tried to do all we do in keeping with the scriptures. Our priorities, our strategy, our preaching, our training and our follow-up of new believers are all hopefully derived from the Bible. We have sometimes fallen short here, and always the result of that has been a shallow work that produced little lasting fruit. Secondly, we have tried to do everything as a fellowship in Christ. That has not been an easy approach to maintain. We are still learning how to do this properly. Keeping the community united was one of my biggest and hardest responsibilities when I led the work. In the community there are daring souls who are not afraid to try new and difficult ways of doing ministry. They help keep us at the cutting edge. But there are also some more conservative folk whose cautions help the growth to take place responsibly. The debates that take place between those backing the different sides on an issue have I think helped keep us from going to unhealthy extremes. Thirdly, we have tried to keep reminding ourselves that people are lost without Christ. The tragedy of lostness helps bring focus to our ministry. Whatever we do must contribute to the saving of lost youth. Our creative advances in arts and the media are never ends in themselves. They must serve the task of bringing salvation to young people. We will try new and uncomfortable things, endure hardships, face fierce opposition and criticism, and pay whatever price needs to be paid in order that we may win the lost. People need the Lord more than anything else in life!

Ajith YFC And Church

This is the personal statement you asked for; for the history book.   When I was in theological college in the USA and I told my friends and teachers that I was hoping to go back to serve in Youth for Christ, there was an almost unanimous response that this would be a mistake. They said that I should go back and serve in a seminary or a church. This caused a lot of turmoil inside of me. I shared this with my parents, and they shared it with our former minister, the Rev. George Good who had had a strong influence on my life. Rev. Good said, “Let him serve in YFC, because in that way he can send a lot of young people from YFC to the church.” Sending the youth we reach to the church is among our primary objects. That has not been an easy task. These young people have met Christ in YFC, and during their first few years as Christians their primary allegiance will be to YFC. They might find it difficult to be committed to the church which has what seems to them like a strange culture. Our methods also differ sometimes and that produces some clashes. For example, disciplining our young volunteers in order that they may overcome their weaknesses is a common practice in YFC. When these youth refuse to take part in a church programme because they are under discipline in YFC, naturally there can be confusion in the church leadership. Sometimes the problems are aggravated because our young staff and volunteers also act with immaturity in their relationships with the church. Despite all these problems, over the years hundreds of youth reached in YFC have found a happy home in their churches and are serving there faithfully. Recently I started to count how many people who were YFC youth are now pastors in churches. The list keeps growing, and now it stands at 72! There is also a long list of pastors’ wives, a longer list of people working in other Christian organisations and an even longer list of lay church leaders. It is also great joy to me that many of our present staff, volunteers and alumni serve as the youth leaders or advisors in their churches. Several YFC people have earned a reputation of being good biblical preachers and teachers and they too are contributing to the churches through the use of their gifts. Realising the value of having examples of YFC people being involved in churches, the YFC board permitted me to get very involved in helping restart the church at which we worship. YFC paid for all the travel and other expenses I incurred in those early years. Now the grassroots ministry of my wife and me is primarily in that church. Since stepping down as National Director I give over 50% of my time to the churches, mentoring and counselling pastors and doing retreats and seminars for leaders usually in places far away from Colombo. I also preach and teach abroad and write books which I hope have blessed the church. I do all this as a missionary of YFC to the churches in Sri Lanka and abroad. YFC handles all my income and expenditure for this wider ministry. Itinerant ministry has many traps that can ruin our lives and ministries. Being under the YFC discipline has served as a source of security to me. I am especially grateful for my accountability group, all YFC alumni, most of whom I have known for over forty years. They monitor my life and ministry and give me much needed advice and rebuke. So I think we have been able to fulfil to some extent what my former pastor hoped for and what my friends and teachers in seminary told that I should be doing! I am so grateful that YFC has found a place for me even after I stepped down from National Directorship. Leonard Fernando is a wonderful boss to work for. I remain as excited about and committed to the YFC ministry as I was when I started full-time in YFC thirty-nine years ago.