On Ambition In Christian Service

October 2010 Ajith Fernando Once I was chatting with a group of younger delegates after the closing session of an international conference at which I had spoken. One of them thanked me for my message and, pointing to the platform, said, “We will be the speakers at the next conference.” I have never felt comfortable about asking God for such things. I know that if I receive any responsibility it is because of God’s mercy and not because of any qualification of mine. I also know that some non-prominent saints are so much closer to God and to the life of obedience than me. In heaven (where it really matters) they will have a much, much higher place than me. I must concentrate on obedience to the will of God; and, right now, I fall short so much that obedience to God has to be my greatest pursuit in life. But if God gives me a job to do, I must try to do it as best as I possibly could, so that God is glorified. A passion for the glory of God is a greater and more noble motivation to excellence than competition—the desire to be better than others. We compete only with ourselves, so that we can be the best we can be for God. By the way, I do not think it is a sin to dream about doing certain things. Those who feel that it may be God’s will for them to aspire after some high office or responsibility should go ahead and pursue that. But they must do so remembering that God may not give them that and that that is not a big problem. They must steer clear of using unprincipled methods in their quest for this. Things like politicking, slandering rivals, and buying up votes are an abomination to God. Those who use those methods may succeed in their quest, but they will be shamed at the judgement where unconfessed secret actions are revealed. It is sheer folly to break God’s principles and do dishonourable things in ones quest for advancement in life. Later I thought that perhaps these young leaders I spoke to may have been kept down by senior leaders who are threatened by their bright ideas and desires. If that were so, what a tragedy that would be! Look at the lives of people like Jesus, Paul, and Barnabas; and you see that a major portion of their ministry was encouraging young people and enabling them, that is, opening doors for ministry for them. What should young people who have seen doors shut in their faces by selfish elders do? Whatever they do, they should not try to come up in the ladder by using means that do not honour God. God is greater than the most powerful leader in the world. Surely we can trust him to give us the best if we follow him. Let’s concentrate on that, and on doing what we do as best as we can. This work may not be done in a prominent place. Important people in the church may not see it. But God sees and he will honour that in his time: in this world—which is not a big deal—or in the next—which is a very big deal! Those who break God’s principles as they seek to achieve their ambitions will one day see what fools they were. If they succeed they would have contributed to creating a culture in the church which brings great dishonour to God. What a terrible legacy to leave behind! So if one door closes, try another, or try a window, or the roof like the men who brought their paralysed friend to Jesus. Don’t give up on the vision God has given you. Each refusal, criticism or rejection could be used by God to help you clarify and sharpen your vision so that the end product is even better. Don’t give up. Remember Paul’s desire to go to Rome. How long it look to be realised! He did finally make it to Rome, as a prisoner! It was because of that vision that we today have the glorious Epistle to the Romans, perhaps his greatest book in the Bible. Paul wrote Romans to introduce himself to the Romans in anticipation of his planned visit. My dear young friends, if you see elders in your church politicking and acting in selfish ways, don’t follow them. They are fools; only fools follow fools. You concentrate on pleasing God. You will not regret it; because God is greater than all the powers of this world! Follow God. Ask God to give you a vision and pursue that vision. You too can do great things for God.

Administrators As Servents

  I have been thinking about some ideas for admin and finance workers that I want to share with you. I want to suggest that you discuss this the other staff when you have a staff meeting. One of the highlights of the past year has been that we have become a more administratively responsible organisation. This is surely in keeping with God’s way to run a Christian organisation. I want to add a few thoughts that have to do with having the proper Christian organisational culture to apply those new procedures and rules. We have brought in a lot of rules to our organisation recently. Things people easily got earlier are now got after some effort and consultation and approvals etc. This is very essential for the organisation but naturally the people will grumble about the new rules. How can we achieve change in a healthy way? I think a key ingredient is for those who apply the administrative structures to be servants of the people. The staff must sense that we are truly concerned over their need. We want to help them, but the best way of helping with within the rules—best for them and best for YFC. We will explore ways in which we can help the staff worker meet his or her need, if we refuse the request. We don’t simply say, “This is not allowed.” We have the person sit with us and talk about why the request was made and try to understand what lies behind it. If the staff know that they have truly been listened to, they may not be angry at the refusal. We must be especially polite and respectful of junior staff. That is the way they are going to learn servanthood. God could use our treating them with respect to heal the wounds of being considered low class that they received from evil society. This could help them also to become servant leaders who enjoy doing good to those who are less powerful. Our behaviour must contribute to the term servant becoming a title of dignity and honour. In order to achieve this, the admin and finance staff must be fully convinced about the appropriateness of our rules and policies. If they don’t believe in the rules they will become defensive and give the sense that they are enforcing it because they have to—then they do a lot of damage to the organisation. I want to encourage all our admin and finance people to talk about any problems they may have about any of our policies. We work not by the law but by the spirit. This does not mean that we are anti-law. It means that we believe that laws are spiritual and are means of achieving spiritual freedom. Laws reflect the order that the Creator God brought into being when he made this world the beautiful place that it is. Those who complain or judge the organisation without talking about it with those who responsible for the rules etc. act in opposition to the body. They have not understood the principle of the body of Christ but have adopted a judgmental attitude of selfish individualism as opposed to corporate solidarity in the body. Isn’t it sad that many people who are supposed to be fighting for justice (a key aspect of the heartbeat of God) are doing that without using God’s methods. Christianity can never be understood apart from the theology of the body of Christ. The idea of a solitary Christian battling for justice sounds very heroic, but it is not biblical. There are no solitary Christians in biblical Christianity. However, people will not express reservations about our rules if we do not have the confidence that they will be seriously listened to. We have to create an atmosphere in YFC that encourages criticism that comes out of a love for YFC. This is why we have initiated the grievance procedure which I have been explaining at different YFC staff and volunteer events. According to this procedure we first go to our supervisor if we have a problem. If we are dissatisfied with our supervisors response, we tell our supervisor and go to his or her supervisor. You know how I have expressed at staff and volunteer conferences how utterly low down and sinful it is for a supervisor to take revenge on someone who complains. Christian servanthood requires a lot of strength. This is why in Acts 6:1-7 when the qualifications were given for admin workers, one of the qualifications was that they be filled with the Spirit (The other two were that they should be people of good reputation and full of wisdom, that is, they should have the ability to carry our the task they are given well). It is sad that we sometimes send to admin jobs people who seem to lack the spiritual qualifications for grassroots ministry. This suggests that admin is spiritually inferior to grassroots ministry. That is wrong. Grassroots ministry gives perspective to admin work. This is why we want all our admin staff to be doing some grassroots ministry. Actually admin duties require a special anointing from God. People get angry when they are refused. It takes the fullness of the Spirit to respond to that anger in a way that honours God. We cannot hit back. We must be firm and polite. That is a combination that is difficult to have. It requires the fullness of the Spirit to act in such a way. This is why just as we need to pray before preaching, we need to pray before doing administrative tasks. The way we do both these jobs can do result in either honour or dishonour to God.